Looking East to Wilshire Boulevard over the Beach

Looking East to Wilshire Boulevard over the Beach

Looking east to Wilshire Boulevard over the beach in Santa Monica. The sand on the beach is not natural to California in these quantities, so it had to be imported from other locations. The development and construction of Wilshire Boulevard actually began at the opposite in Downtown Los Angeles and progressed west until it reached the beach, so perhaps this series would be more historically authentic if I had begun there and flown west, but then how would I have included this image? I could not have. So I shot the Wilshire series from the end, to the beginning. 

The End of Wilshire Boulevard at the Beach in Santa Monica

The End of Wilshire Boulevard at the Beach in Santa Monica

Looking east to Wilshire Boulevard over the beach in Santa Monica. The cliff above Highway 1 and beneath Wilshire is astonishing from the air. The development and construction of Wilshire Boulevard actually began at the opposite in Downtown Los Angeles and progressed west until it reached the beach, so perhaps this series would be more historically authentic if I had begun there and flown west, but then how would I have included these images of the cliffs of Santa Monica? I could not have. So I shot the Wilshire series from the end, to the beginning. 

Entering Westwood

Entering Westwood

The zoning and high rise luxury multi-family towers in Westwood are unique to Los Angeles, and it remarkable to notice from the air for the first time, that nearly all of them are white.

The Westwood Corridor

The Westwood Corridor

Wishire Boulevard twists through Westwood on its way to Beverly Hills. The zoning and high rise luxury multi-family towers in Westwood are unique in Los Angeles, and it was remarkable to notice from the air after seeing them countless times from the ground, that nearly all of them are white. I stayed in one of these buildings for one month after moving to Los Angeles in 1990.

The Westwood Corridor

The Westwood Corridor

By law, buildings of this size in Los Angeles are required to have helicopter landing pads on their rooftop to make it possible for medical rescue in the event of emergencies. Wishire Boulevard twists through Westwood on its way to Beverly Hills. The zoning and high rise luxury multi-family towers in Westwood are unique in Los Angeles, and it was remarkable to notice from the air after seeing them countless times from the ground, that nearly all of them are white. I stayed in one of these buildings for one month after moving to Los Angeles in 1990.

Los Angeles Country Club

Los Angeles Country Club

Wilshire Boulevard looking east over the Los Angeles Country Club golf course.

Beverly Hills Hilton

Beverly Hills Hilton

Wilshire Boulevard exits the Los Angeles Country Club as it approaches the Beverly Hills Hilton with helipad, and the intersection with Santa Monica Boulevard at the west end of Beverly Hills.

Santa Monica Boulevard

Santa Monica Boulevard

Wilshire, center, crosses Santa Monica Boulevard before it enters Beverly Hills and the Miracle Mile beyond.

Beverly Hills Shopping District

Beverly Hills Shopping District

San Vicente Boulevard

San Vicente Boulevard

San Vicente Boulevard crosses Wilshire and slices off into the haze of the southeastern portion of Wilshire Center. Park La Brea is visible in the deep left background.

Los Angeles County Museum of Art

Los Angeles County Museum of Art

L.A. County Museum of Art is visible lower left, and the Paige Museum is just beyond to the east.

Mid-Wilshire

Mid-Wilshire

Koreatown at Wilton Place

Koreatown at Wilton Place

Koreatown is the largest Korean community in the world outside Korea, and occupies some of the most historically significant sites on Wilshire Boulevard. The movie industry was centered here before the rise of Hollywood.

Koreatown at the old Ambassador Hotel

Koreatown at the old Ambassador Hotel

The Ambassador Hotel, once the meeting place of stars and celebrities, home of the Coconut Grove and no longer extant, is visible at center right. The Equitable tower at left, could be evidence that we were flying below the legal limit of 500 feet. If we were, you can't completely blame the pilot. I wanted these images to be more like landscape photographs than conventional aerials so I was constantly saying into my headset "Lower!, lower!!"

Downtown Los Angeles

Downtown Los Angeles